Book Fair 2007


The 20th Annual Independent and Small Press Book Fair Was a Smash!


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Children's Books
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Colligraphy Display
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Cross Section
Three Women Display
In The Library

Looking Down on the Library from the Balcony

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The 2007 Book Fair attracted no less than 3,000 visitors. This year, 79 exhibitors graced the three levels at The New York Center for Independent Publishing, of the General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen, also known as (CIP), from the Library and Balcony to the two rooms on the second floor, flaunting their pride through thousands of magnificent publications.

The Friday just before the book fair featured a panel of five copyright experts who discussed the wares of foreign copyright, including the business of overseas sales, publishing overseas and publishing works in translation overseas.

Following the copyright panel, former Colorado Congresswoman, the eloquent Patricia Scott Schroeder, now President and Chief Executive Officer of The Association of American Publishers (AAP), held a captivating talk addressing the many convoluted issues of protecting the rights of authors, highlighting the banner books are not dead in her theme.

There was wine this year, at least for the publishers and independent authors who took part. Again, Karen Taylor, the Executive Director of CIP, put together a rather remarkable program that will prove memorable. Among the more dazzling of the 13 groups that took place during the book fair, Qu’est-ce que c’est sex & violence dominated discussions. A small press that revealed steamy covers on their romance collection lurked just outside the discussion room.


Contrary to previous years, a large number of publishers of children’s books took up much of the Balcony, while the Library supported those with large and rich selections of fresh titles. Surprisingly, the upper floors remained crowded with people right through the end.